February 2014

Click here for further details ..

Thrillers Of The Month – Febuary 2014

The Thrillers Of The Month are:

- A Song For The Dying by Stuart MacBride, published by Harper Collins

- Horror Flick by Bob Zeidman

- A Quiet Place To Die by Neil Randall, published by Wild Wolf Publishing

- The Keeper by Luke Delaney, published by Harper Collins

- Walk A Narrow Mile by Faith Martin, published by Robert Hale Publishing

- Sacrifice by Max Kinnings, published by Quercus

We are always open to new submissions from authors/publishers – click here

   A Song For The Dying by Stuart MacBride
Review by RR Gordon, author of the bestselling Gull Rock

Eight years ago, ‘The Inside Man’ murdered four women and left three more in critical condition – all of them with their stomachs slit open and a plastic doll stitched inside – and then the killer disappeared.Ash Henderson was a Detective Inspector on the initial investigation, but now his family life has been ruined, his career is in tatters. Now a nurse has turned up dead on a patch of waste ground, a plastic doll buried beneath her skin, and it looks as if Ash might get a shot at redemption.

Stuart MacBride’s ex-detective, Ash Henderson, takes us on a gripping ride through the most gritty of thrillers. MacBride’s ability to draw an array of characters with whom we empathise, while fully aware of their flaws, means the reader is engaged from the start. An excellent, dark novel full of grit and vice...

Rating: An excellent thriller

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Horror Flick by Bob Zeidman
Review by Charlotte Waller…

Horror Flick is everything you’d expect to experience when watching a mystery supernatural movie, which means I really enjoyed reading it. There’s your token cop who doesn’t have much in life, your crazy movie guy, and the witchy woman who saves the day with her theories.I’m a sucker for supernatural movies, and this really painted a picture so you could actually believe you were watching a movie rather than reading a book. The writing helped to create that image, and I saw every scene in exact detail.

It will leave you guessing until the very end about what they will do to stop the murders, and you might be very surprised at the direction this book goes.

Rating: Supernaturally fun!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   A Quiet Place To Die by Neil Randall
Review by Jane Brown …

I thought this was a little slow to get going, but I was glad I persevered as this was a great read and then I could not put this book down.There are some interesting and strange characters with great descriptions. Bobby Philips has relocated to a sleepy fishing village following a strange tragedy. His next door neighbour is a local builder with a reputation as a rogue in his trade. The author teases the reader by giving us small amounts of information about Bobby’s tragedy to keep the pages turning. At the same time a dark comedy flows through.

The twist at the end is explosive and it was a great end to the story. I expect to hear a lot more about the author Neil Randall over the coming years.

Rating: Highly recommended!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   The Keeper by Luke Delaney
Review by RR Gordon, author of the bestselling Gull Rock

Luke Delaney’s second novel in the Sean Corrigan detective series is not a disappointment, rivalling Cold Killing for pace and suspense.Detective Inspector Sean Callaghan is the lead of the Murder Investigation Team for the South London division of the Metropolitan Police, experienced dealing with the human detritus. His Superintendent gives Callaghan and his team an unusual missing persons case to investigate. Women of a certain height and look are being taken in broad daylight but it is not till the dead bodies start turning up that they realise they are racing against the clock.

Edgy, well-drawn characters compete in a grisly world you just know is real.

Rating: First rate!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Walk A Narrow Mile by Faith Martin
Review by Ben Morris…

An effective police procedural, with its eyes firmly on the story. You know there will be a twist, and there is.Ex-DI Hillary Greene has returned to the Thames Valley force as a civilian consultant with the cold cases team. Her own recent encounter with a stalker seems to be tied to three unsolved missing persons cases, all women. She fears the worst and so do we; the game of cat and mouse begins.

Set in Morse country, Faith Martin doesn’t always avoid cliché, and the walk-ons tend to central casting, but I liked DI Greene. It’s refreshing to find a cop, and a woman at that, of a certain age, and it’s enjoyably frank (though always discreet) about her feelings for the younger colleague she is seeing.

The story builds and holds the tension, and it made me want to keep reading, which is always the bottom line.

A book to feed the habit, in other words; a good read for the train, Tube, or getaway flight, for which Kindle and friends are perfect.

Rating: An excellent read

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Sacrifice by Max Kinnings
Review by Sophie Scott …

An English banker’s mansion is his fortress, right?The second book in a series featuring blind hostage negotiator, Ed Mallory.
It’s Christmas Day and the only thing disgraced hedge fund manager Graham Poynter can celebrate is that he and his family are beyond reach of the baying media, safely barricaded into their Belgravia home.
Eighteen months have passed since BAPTISM’s murder on the underground, and Ed Mallory has left the force to earn a living as a freelance negotiator but finds himself more frequently called to the business lecture circuit than a hostage situation. With a recently failed negotiation behind him and feeling marginalized by ‘his new role as a consultant’, Ed’s paranoia and confidence are at an almost lifetime low when he is faced with a hostage-taker without apparent motive, with whom it’s ‘like talking to a colleague’.
In a short and deadly opening chapter, Kinnings shunts the reader immediately into the action, before teasing out the suspense, turning back the ticking clock of the narrative by four meticulously illustrated hours from this first death. Exploring the nature of privilege and greed, Kinnings does a convincing job of creating swift but rounded psychological profiles, in particular of the family taken hostage and their captor, who is the most appealing and likeable of them all. Kinnings continues to make beautiful use of Mallory’s four remaining senses to describe and interpret his surroundings. He manoeuvres the reader into and outside his characters’ heads, constantly playing with the perspective and making reading joyfully compulsive. Hence, as Graham Poynter stands at the edge of his roof feeling like a rock star ‘holding the attention of the crowd’ with ‘a new sense of freedom’, the police observe with simple horror that Poynter ‘nearly fell again’.
Though it lacks the gloriously personal connection of BAPTISM (where the use of public transport and random victims gave the narrative an Everyman possibility) this is another deftly crafted, page-turning thriller. The novel won’t make your heart palpitate with the fearful prospect that this could happen to you, which was part of the brilliance of Kinnings’ first novel. However, for all that the characters are vivid and varied, by riffing on their human greed for excitement, for risk and power, Kinnings explores how closely they resemble one another better to divine the difference between victim and criminal.

Rating: The second compelling and topical page-turner from an author who knows what he’s doing.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK