September 2013

Are you looking for a good thriller to read on your Kindle or other e-reader? www.e-thriller.com is the leading reviewer of e-thrillers from major publishers and independents. Each month we have dozens of submissions for review from the largest publishers around the world – and just as many from independent publishers and authors. Each of our review panel selects a number of books to read and then puts forward the very best as their Book Of The Month. At the start of each month our publicity goes out to around 50,000 readers and our site receives hundreds of visitors per day.

Thrillers Of The Month - September 2013

This month featuring

- Deepest Doors by Paul Winters, published by World Castle Publishing

- Murder At Wrotham Hill by Diane Souhami, published by Quercus

- Wishbone by Brooklyn Hudson

- Veil Of Civility by Ian Graham

- In Too Deep by Bea Davenport, published by Legend Press

- Penance by Dan O’Shea, published by Exhibit A Books

- Killing With Confidence by Matt Bendoris

We are always open to new submissions from authors/publishers – click here

   Deepest Doors by Paul Winters
Review by Paul Morris

This is a ‘Manchurian Candidate’ type conspiracy theory story with a confused businessman searching to plug the holes in his memory, ably assisted by the woman who literally knocked him off his feet. Echoes of ‘A History of Violence’ and the ‘Bourne’ novels run through this book, but without it being a simple copycat. A good read for all those who like a taut conspiracy thriller.

Review by RR Gordon, author of the bestselling Gull Rock

James McBride’s perfectly structured corporate life suddenly begins to unravel as he learns that every memory he has seems to be false. His life changes one afternoon after a collision with Sarah Plummer, a beautiful and free-spirited woman, and they find themselves being pursued by people from his firm, singularly intent on killing her and capturing him.

Deepest Doors is an intriguing, fast-paced thriller that keeps you turning the pages to find out what’s going to happen next. Paul Winters has created a set of characters with whom the reader can identify and a plot that races along like an unstoppable train. I heartily recommend it.

Rating: A cracking read!

Where To Buy:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Deepest-Doors-Paul-Winters/dp/193986576X

http://www.amazon.com/Deepest-Doors-Paul-Winters/dp/193986576X 

 

   Murder At Wrotham Hill by Diane Souhami
Review by Wendy Cartmell

Murder at Wrotham Hill takes the killing in October 1946 of Dagmar Petrzywalski as the catalyst for a compelling and unique meditation on murder and fate. Dagmar, a gentle, eccentric spinster, was the embodiment of Austerity Britain’s prudence and thrift.

Her murderer Harold Hagger’s litany of petty crimes, abandoned wives, sloughed-off identities and desertion was its opposite. This author description is a true reflection of the book, as it is indeed a meditation on murder and fate. But it is also a meditation on the people who lived through the war years in England.

Many times it brought to mind `In Cold Blood’ by Truman Capote which is high on my list of all time favourite books and Murder at Wrotham Hill is not far behind. A compelling story is brought to life through the characters and I was particularly interested in Albert Pierrepoint, the hangman, who the author described extremely well.

Whilst there was a certain amount of repetition in the book, which one would expect when talking about a murder investigation and statements given to the police, this does not detract from the reader’s enjoyment. The description of the social history of the time serves to help readers understand the mindset of the characters and the austerity of the war years provides a stark background to the murder investigation.

Rating: A compelling story.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Wishbone by Brooklyn Hudson
Review by Ronda Caudill

Wishbone by Brooklyn Hudson was a great read. The story was truly unique. I love the idea behind a wish going bad. The story is very engaging and keeps the reader guessing all the way until the end.

I loved the characters. They were so well developed; it made the reader feel as if they knew them personally. Poor Jullen and Rachel don’t have a clue when they moved to the Kings Hollow what they were in for.

I don’t want to give away any spoilers. However, anyone who loves a good twisted thriller should definitely read Wishbone. Hats off to Brooklyn Hudson! This is a must read. I give it a 5 out of 5 stars.

Rating: 5 stars.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Veil Of Civility by Ian Graham
Review by Paul Morris  

Irish immigrant made good with an interesting past gets an uncomfortable wake up call when the bad guys come calling and mess with one of his oldest buddies who’s also come to America to escape the past and start a new life. But the bad guys are tangling with the wrong guy. A mixture of Jason Bourne and Jack Reacher with an Irish brogue soon sends the body count sky-high, but this in no romper stomper with no soul.

With a heady mixture of Mossad and IRA to keep the plot going this is a must read for all those who like thrillers with the added X factor. Looking forward to the next instalment and hopefully a Hollywood release.

Rating: Must read for all those who like thrillers with the added X factor.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   In Too Deep by Bea Davenport
Review by Helen Hayes  

In Too Deep is the story of Maura, who having witnessed the death of her best friend Kim five years previously, has fled her old life and taken on an anonymous identity in London. Working for less than the minimum wage in two dead end jobs desperately trying to make ends meet she is both horrified and terrified when a journalist traces her and persuades her to talk about her suspicions surrounding the bizarre accident which killed Kim.

Set in the fictional town of Dowerby, a claustrophobic, old fashioned and openly misogynist place, we learn through Maura’s story what really happened to Kim and the part that Maura played in it. Told in flashbacks, we learn why Maura is in London and the reasons she has fled from the town and life that oppressed her.  When out of town journalist Kim is transferred to Dowerby she rattles more than a few of the locals both professionally – and personally.  As their friendship intensifies, she is also instrumental in bringing Maura out of herself, encouraging her talents building her confidence and forcing her to face the truth about her abusive marriage. The depiction of which, both physical and mental I found totally believable.  Layer upon layer of violence, deceit and secrets are uncovered as Maura fears that her own life in danger – once again.

This is a story written in a style that draws you in from the first dramatic paragraph. The characters are well structured and the essence of the town cleverly drawn with annual fairs and flocks of tourists (there is a wonderful scene when Maura attends the fair committee a lone woman challenging some of the committee’s stereotypes!).  Davenport has delivered a really promising debut novel.

Rating: A compelling page turner.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Penance by Dan O’Shea
Review by Leslie Gardner…

Dan O’Shea has written a big, ambitious and intricate story set in the big city of Chicago. What struck me most powerfully is the sheer verbal dexterity of the writing, and deft energy of the dialogue – at centre is detective John Lynch. He’s tough and well-connected, knows right from wrong…and you need to in this story! Wow: we get a sense of people’s personalities and character  through their talk in a way reminding me of the great American crime writers (thinking here of George V Higgins for example).

O’Shea also manages to propel us through a complex plot uncovering deep, pervasive corruption in the city. In fact, the implied theme about the way crime spreads and infects a city and just everyday people (and its consequence demonstrated in opening sequence as an unrolling discovery of murder is brilliant – a major criminal’s mother is assassinated on her way home from her usual round of good works for the church) – his theme is immediately conveyed compactly and without commentary. Our perspectives are manipulated but there is no sense of contrivance. I suppose the only downside is its density makes it a chewy read – but what is wrong with that? This is a great book to dig into.

Rating: A powerful read.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

   Killing With Confidence by Matt Bendoris
Review by Leslie Gardner…

‘Killing with confidence’ is an authentic, robust and fast-paced funny crime story. The least persuasive character is the killer himself actually – but the politics of a newsroom, and the killer instincts of the journalists and the complicit criminals is sophisticated and hilarious when it isn’t tragic – and despite his showing off, the worst criminal is not the serial killer!

There are kicks and twists throughout  – a bit too repetitious about the overweight journalist who makes good, April, and the jokes about alcoholic journos, but all in all, really captivating, funny and engaging. very impressive. Hopefully this author will do more.

Rating: Captivating, funny and engaging.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK