May 2013

Are you looking for a good thriller to read on your Kindle or other e-reader? www.e-thriller.com is the leading reviewer of e-thrillers from major publishers and independents. Each month we have dozens of submissions for review from the largest publishers around the world – and just as many from independent publishers and authors. Each of our review panel selects a number of books to read and then puts forward the very best as their Book Of The Month. At the start of each month our publicity goes out to around 50,000 readers and our site receives hundreds of visitors per day.

Thrillers Of The Month - May 2013

This month featuring

- Polar Nights by Simon Hacker

- Stark Contrasts by Peter Carroll

- A Fatal Verdict by Tim Vicary

- Powder Burn by Mark Chisnell

- Enraged by OJ Nkeonye

- Origin by JT Brannan, published by Headline

- Live And Let Die by Bianca Sloane

- Cold Killing by Luke Delaney, published by Harper Collins

We are always open to new submissions from authors/publishers – click here

    Polar Nights by Simon Hacker
Review by RR Gordon, author of the bestselling Gull Rock

Polar Nights is a good book. I could go on for ages about it, but I’ll try to be brief …One night an iceberg floats into a small Scottish harbour – with a polar bear on board. To the consternation of the locals, this phenomenon attracts a wide variety of characters: scientists, reporters, eco-warriors, government officials – some of whom have sinister intent.I’m a big fan of the majestic beauty of the Scottish scenery – who isn’t? – and Polar Nights is thick with evocative descriptions of Scotland, its weather in early December and the sea.

You can tell that the author loves language: the prose flows richly like molten chocolate. Every sentence is lovingly crafted, honed and sculpted before being bedded into the perfect place in a paragraph. The characters are interesting, likeable (or not likeable when the author intends) and painted with feeling.

Having said all that, I wouldn’t recommend a book if the story itself wasn’t up to scratch – but, don’t worry, Polar Nights is different, humourous and engaging. This is a thoroughly enjoyable tale that should sell by the bucketload.

Rating: A sumptuous read.

Where To Buy:
Click here for Amazon USA

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    Stark Contrasts by Peter Carroll
Review by Paul Morris

Convinced that modern life is rubbish? Living in a town or city where you feel alienated and alone?  Fed up of being pushed from pillar to post by rude people who push their way on the Tube and young yobs who play their music too loud from personal headphones and gob their gum out on the pavement?Well Citizen V is your man or woman! Striking back for the little man or woman they embark on a series of vigilante actions against the tide of yobs plaguing the streets. Making sure that the ‘punishment fits the crime’ our latter-day here strikes back. But has this vigilantism gone too far as the relatively mild punishments turn to maiming and murder?Tasked to find the mysterious Citizen V, the beloved darling of the media, world weary Detective Stark enters the fray. Entertaining reading and will make you think twice again before tailgating on the roads, spitting gum or playing your music too loud on public transport!

Rating: Great satisfaction for any reader!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

     A Fatal Verdict by Tim Vicary
Review by Wendy Cartmell

Tim Vicary is fast establishing himself as a superb legal thriller writer. His series, the trials of Sarah Newby is set within the British legal system, focused on the cases of barrister Sarah Newby. She is a woman full of determination, having gained her legal degree as a mature student. She is also part of a cast of characters, all of which are flawed in some way, as Sarah herself is. Her husband, because of the strains of their marriage, becomes enamoured with someone at work. Her friend and fellow barrister is facing his own impending marriage. The policeman in her life, Terry Bateson, is a widower and single parent and secretly in love with Sarah. And so Tim Vicary waives his storytelling wand over them all and creates a strong base on which weave his plot around.In the second book in the series, a woman is let down by the legal system, after her daughter Shelley is found dead in her boyfriend’s flat. The police initially think it is suicide but after further investigation, charge her boyfriend with murder. Sarah Newby is the barrister acting for the prosecution, trying to prove that David Kidd killed Shelley. This constitutes the first half of the book. The second half concentrates on the revenge of the family, as they seek their own justice against Shelley’s boyfriend and once again Sarah is drawn into the proceedings, but this time as barrister for the defence.The novel follows smoothly on from the first book, as well as being a stand-alone novel, and is intriguing, interesting and emotionally draining, as you identify with the family of Shelley Walters and the struggles of Sarah Newby. An outstanding legal e-thriller.

Rating: An outstanding legal e-thriller

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

    Powder Burn by Mark Chisnell
Review by Leslie Gardner

Fresh characters in a mix of romance and metaphysical thriller make this book an unusual read: it’s the themes of sexism, and political upheaval and secrets we hold from each other that drive these people.Sam is trying for a BIG story as a new journalist and in a heavy night of drinking with strangers, thinks she’s found it and joins an overland hiking and camping journey with a small team looking for a secret location. A cameraman who knows the way but won’t tell, a knowledgeable but contentious expert and the gorgeous adventurer who snared her, are the companions on what becomes more and more a hazardous journey. Her bravura and smarts bring a lot to the table.Despite its drifting unfocussed part of the way, it gets right back on track soon enough. This is definitely a cross-over adventure genre, putting together suspence and thriller elements combined with inexplicable presences and pressures on them (in one case, fatal) which make this the unique read it is.

Rating: A highly recommended e-thriller.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

    Enraged by OJ Nkeonye
Review by Leslie Gardner

The build up of foreboding and outrage drives this inevitable narrative hard in this novel based on a true story – and that is what’s most upsetting of all to contemplate! An African woman married to lazy son of a multi-billionaire Russian suffers when he has clearly done wrong by her and their children. Only when his mother, forced to an action that will haunt her all her days, intervenes can we breathe a sigh of relief as our appealing heroine does too.Told simply and boldly, this reads quickly and the relentless sequence of detail that accumulates as she starts to find out the truth pushed me to read fast and almost to skim to find out the denouement. Okay there’s some fantasy events here, and unlikely characterisations, some clunky writing but there is a sense of authenticity in time and place that is intriguing. A brutal, intense read told without stylistic indulgence.Rating: A brutal, intense read

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

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    Origin by JT Brannan
Review by Ronda L Caudill

Origin by J.T. Brannan is a gripping and thrilling novel. Evelyn Edwards, a research scientist, is thrilled by the discovery of a 40,000 year old body buried in the Antarctic. Her wondrous discovery soon turns to a nightmare for her and her team. Someone will stop at nothing to keep the secrets that were buried with body kept a secret. Evelyn turns to her ex-husband, Matt, for help. Together they uncover a fantastic conspiracy that will take them from Area 51 to the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva.J.T. Brannan created a fantastic and thrilling story that keeps you on the edge of your seat from beginning until the end. The characters are so well developed that reader feels as if they know them. The story twists and turns and keeps you wondering what will happen next.This novel makes you really ponder the origin of mankind and makes you think twice about dredging up things that are better off left undiscovered. I give this book 5 stars out of 5 and would highly recommend it. Hats off to you J.T.! I look forward to reading future work by this amazing author.

Rating: Hats off!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK

    Live And Let Die by Bianca Sloane
Review by Helen Hayes

This is American author Bianca Stone’s first novel. You wouldn’t know it. This is a great story that carries you along with it from the first page. On a bitterly cold January evening, a newlywed young TV producer, Tracy Ellis, goes jogging along a snowy Chicago lakefront and disappears. Her body is discovered days later and the police conclude her brutal – and seemingly motiveless – death to be a mugging gone horribly wrong and with no suspect, prime or otherwise, they close the case.Fast forward a year, and Tracy’s elder sister, Sondra, still can’t come to terms with her sister’s violent death. She throws herself into her work as a documentary filmmaker, traveling the globe and trying to block out the cruelty of Tracy’s death.  But a chance encounter with Tracy’s ex (the man Sondra always thought her sister would marry), tears open the unhealed scar and Sondra starts to question her sister’s death and indeed her life.

As Sondra delves into her sister’s life, she starts to discover things that simply don’t add up and I found myself willing her on, trying to second guess the next twist – all while wishing she would slow down, stop chain-smoking and look after herself properly!

As Sondra doggedly struggles to uncover what happened to Tracy, doubts begin to engulf her, and what of Tracy’s new groom who has remarried within a year, where is he now? Sandra, thrown into a web of deceit, danger and confusion seems to be on a collision course with life and death – enjoy the ride!

Rating: Enjoy the ride!

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

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 Cold Killing by Luke Delaney
“The Chinese swear that dog meat tastes all the sweeter if the dog is terrified before being butchered. I would have to agree.”

Review by Sophie Scott

A slew of inventively brutal killings of unconnected victims at crime scenes cleaned of all forensic evidence; an unknown serial-killer whose only motive is to return to the “mercilessness” and “violence” of Nature: “Because I have to”; and, a detective whose powerfully morbid imagination is a product of his abusive past.

These murders seem truly to be in cold blood, while being described by the (almost) chillingly dispassionate killer with all the pleasurable sensuality of a love affair. There’s a deft dance between DI Corrigan’s instincts and the killer’s confidence as police try to ascertain what is “progression” and what’s “camouflage” in the murderer’s changing tactics. Sean Corrigan’s reimagining of the murders – uncannily close to each original – are enthralling and disturbing. His family life is real, impossibly rocked by his job and opposing responsibilities. He is neither a loner nor a bachelor at heart, but driven by fear of and a need to avoid his own potential for abuse. His colleagues have their own agendas, their own concerns, and their own negotiations with the moral complexities of their lives. There are no minor characters, only people the reader gets to know more intimately than others – and Delaney uses each introduction (whether a shopkeeper, bouncer, or antiques-seller) to deepen his portrayals of the people he follows throughout the novel. There are no cursory exchanges.

Delaney takes apparently well-trodden ground, and confounds the reader’s expectations. The plotting is excellent, the narrative swift and sparky. He weaves his cast with the dexterity of an artisan and has created a string of convincing, potential protagonists, giving himself the real opportunity to spin-off multiple series. There’s a rich density to the layering of points-of-view, and the creepy recurrence of first-person-narration – almost journal-like, even epistolary at times – in amongst various third-persons’ (victims, police, suspects) is effectively unsettling. It’s rare to finish reading a book, feeling satisfied whilst still looking over your shoulder on the way to the bathroom at night; but Delaney’s cleverly leading and consciously anonymous “I” haunted me for several days. The final chapter left me vulnerably alert, wondering, do we really know who that voice belongs to?

Rating: Tight, imaginative plotting and authentic, intelligent characterisation from a debut writer, who happens to be an ex-Met murder squad detective.

Where To Buy:

Click here for Amazon USA

Click here for Amazon UK